— Sports

After child death, US says to stop using Peloton treadmill

NEW YORK (AP) – Safety regulators warned people with kids and pets Saturday to immediately stop using a treadmill made by Peloton after one child died and nearly 40 others were injured. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said it received reports of children and a pet being pulled, pinned, and entrapped under the rear roller of the Tread+ treadmill, leading to fractures, scrapes, and the death of one child.

The commission posted a video on its YouTube page of a child being pulled under the treadmill.

In a news release, New York-based Peloton Interactive Inc. said that the warning was “inaccurate and misleading.” It said there’s no reason to stop using the treadmill as long as children and pets are kept away from it at all times, it is turned off when not in use, and a safety key is removed.

But the safety commission said that in at least one episode, a child was pulled under the treadmill while a parent was running on it, suggesting it can be dangerous to children even while a parent is present.

If adults want to keep using the treadmill, the commission said, they should use it only in a locked room so children and pets can’t come near it. The treadmill should be unplugged and the safety key taken out and hidden away when not in use. The commission also said to keep exercise balls and other objects away because those have been pulled under the treadmill.

Peloton is best known for its stationary bikes, but it introduced the treadmill about three years ago and now calls it the Tread+. It costs more than $4,000.

Sales of Peloton equipment have soared during the pandemic as virus-weary people avoid gyms and work out at home instead. The company brought in $1 billion in revenue in the last three months of 2020, more than double its income from the same period a year before.

The commission did not say how many of the Peloton treadmills have been sold.

Follow Joseph Pisani on Twitter: @ josephpisani

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Molly Aronson

Molly Aronson is a 26-year-old government politician who enjoys bowling, running and jigsaw puzzles. She is creative and exciting, but can also be very greedy and a bit greedy.She is an australian Christian who defines herself as straight. She has a post-graduate degree in philosophy, politics and economics. She is allergic to grasshoppers.

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